Rating the world-class Waterville Valley Tennis Center

The Waterville Valley Tennis Center is again listed as a Gold medal resort in the annual www.tennisresortsonline.com for Top 25-world ranking. If you have played the Waterville Valley Tennis Center please visit www.tennisresortsonline.com and look to the left of the home page and click on "Write a Review." And if you have not, then come to Waterville Valley this summer and see what you are missing!

Set amid the mountains in Waterville Valley, the Waterville Valley Tennis Center has been delighting tennis enthusiasts of all abilities for more than 100 years. Since its inception, the Tennis Center have consistently been rated among the top 25 in the world.  With 18 outdoor clay tennis courts and 2 indoor courts, the Tennis Center has the facilities, instruction, staff and setting to make your tennis adventure a memorable one.  

Not to be overlooked by our incredible mountain setting, their expert instruction, led by Head Pro, Tom Gross.  The Tennis Center offers private or group lessons for all ages and abilities and have teamed up with New England Tennis Holidays to offer the best expertise available.  

Tennis Magazine ranks the Tennis Center as one of the Top 50 tennis resorts in America, along with being named one of the Top 5 Best Bargains, as well as one of the Top 5 Family Resorts.  The Tennis Center was recently been ranked "One of the Top Tennis Resorts in the World" by TennisResortsOnline.  Since 2001, Tennis Resorts Online has ranked Waterville Valley Tennis as one of the best in the world, along with a #2 ranking for Best Setting, #4 for Kids Programs and #4 for Best Value.  

And Waterville Valley is much more than just a tennis resort.  In summer, you'll find golf, biking, swimming & hiking; winter offers nordic and downhill skiing, tubing & sleigh rides, plus year-round athletic club access, ice skating, kids' recreation and much more, making our resort a destination for year-round family fun.

The Waterville Valley Tennis Center is listed as a Gold medal resort in the annual  tennisresortsonline.com earning at Top 25-world ranking

The Waterville Valley Tennis Center is listed as a Gold medal resort in the annual

 tennisresortsonline.com earning at Top 25-world ranking


Olympian Nolan Kasper Wins White Mountain Dual Challenge at Waterville Valley Resort

Nolan Kasper, age 28, of Warren, Vermont, won Saturday's race on the World Pro Ski Tour at Waterville Valley, New Hampshire. He heads to South Korea for the Olympic Games to compete in the slalom competition on February 22. He edged out Canadian skier Morgan Megarry, 24, of Collingwood, Ontario, for the win in the final round. Third and fourth place went to Michael Ankeny, age 27, of Wayzata, Minnesota, and Robby Kelley, age 27 of Starksboro, Vermont.

 

"It was great to see such a big crowd of enthusiastic supporters today at Waterville Valley for this event. Like all the racers here today, I am thrilled to see that the World Pro Ski Tour has come back after being dormant for so long," said Kasper.

 

Dubbed the White Mountain Dual Challenge, the race was the first stop of the World Pro Ski Tour featuring 32 ski racers from around the U.S., Canada, Finland, Sweden, and France. Next stop for the tour is Aspen, Colorado, March 9 and 10, followed by the final race of the series at Sunday River, Maine, March 30 and 31.

 

The races will air on CBS Sports Network on April 1 at 1 p.m. for Waterville Valley; April 8 at 2:30 p.m. for Aspen, and April 15 for the Sunday River event.

 

Agate: 

White Mountain Dual Challenge, February 8 - 10, 2018, the first stop of World Pro Ski Tour :

  1. Nolan Kasper, Warren, Vermont, age 28
  2. Morgan Megarry, Collingwood, Ontario, Canada, age 24
  3. Michael Ankeny, Wayzata, Minnesota, age 27
  4. Robby Kelley, Starksboro, Vermont, age 27

For more information on the World Pro Ski Tour, go to www.worldproskitour.com.

Dubbed the White Mountain Dual Challenge, the race was the first stop of the World Pro Ski Tour featuring 32 ski racers from around the U.S., Canada, Finland, Sweden, and France. Next stop for the tour is Aspen, Colorado, March 9 and 10, followed by the final race of the series at Sunday River, Maine, March 30 and 31.

Dubbed the White Mountain Dual Challenge, the race was the first stop of the World Pro Ski Tour featuring 32 ski racers from around the U.S., Canada, Finland, Sweden, and France. Next stop for the tour is Aspen, Colorado, March 9 and 10, followed by the final race of the series at Sunday River, Maine, March 30 and 31.

Waterville Valley Resort Continues 2018 Lineup of National Events with Toyota U.S. Revolution Tour and U.S. Freestyle Championships

The Toyota U.S. Revolution Tour will return to the East Coast for slopestyle competitions for free skiing and snowboarding on Feb. 11-16, 2018 at Waterville Valley Resort for the second year. The U.S. Revolution Tour has proved to be a progressive venue for today’s top junior riders to take the competitive stage in slopestyle. The tour is designed to serve as a stepping-stone for athletes making the transition from competing at the grassroots level to the elite level. The series is focused toward riders 14-19 years old for slopestyle. Top winners may earn an invite to be part of the U.S. Grand Prix, Junior Worlds, USASA Nationals, and participate in Project Gold camps.

 

Then, the nation’s best freestyle skiers will compete for national titles this spring at the 2018 U.S. Freestyle Championships. Aerials competitions will take place at the Utah Olympic Park followed by mogul competitions at New Hampshire’s Waterville Valley Resort.

 

The U.S. Moguls Championships will be returning to the East Coast for the first time since 2012. Competition is scheduled for March 20-24 and will feature moguls and dual moguls. Known as the "Birthplace of Freestyle Skiing", the event will return to Waterville Valley Resort's Lower Bobby's Run trail, home of the first-ever National Freestyle Championships in 1970. Morgan Schild (Rochester, N.Y.) and Jaelin Kauf (Alta, Wyo.) are the reigning women’s moguls and dual moguls champions. Hunter Bailey (Vail, Colo.) will be looking to defend both the men’s moguls and dual moguls titles.

 

Waterville Valley Resort is a four-season resort set in the heart of the White Mountain National Forest. “New Hampshire’s Family Resort” features 265 acres of downhill skiing

Waterville Valley Resort is a four-season resort set in the heart of the White Mountain National Forest. “New Hampshire’s Family Resort” features 265 acres of downhill skiing

World Pro Ski Tour Qualifying Runs at Waterville Valley Resort

Michael Ankeny from Wayzata, Minnesota, a member of Team Slalom Tokyo Drift, was the top qualifier in the White Mountain Dual Challenge Saturday at Waterville Valley ski resort in  New Hampshire.

 

"I had experience from the World Pro Ski Tour last year that I drew on today," said Ankeny. "Some of the other competitors were overestimating the jumps, but I knew that I could stay aggressive and take a tight line. I have been in Europe for a month or so, and it was great to get back to the U.S. and ski fast against a great group of guys on the first day of the tour today." 
 

The World Pro Ski Tour event featured top American, Canadian, and European competitors on Tommy's World Cup Run at Waterville Valley. The dual slalom course challenged the racers and the two five-foot tall jumps took some competitors out of the course.

Competing in his first World Pro Ski Tour event, 2018 U.S. Olympian Nolan Kasper is a favorite going into the finals on Saturday, "I had a great time on the hill today and I am looking forward to figuring the course out more tomorrow. The dual slalom format is unique and I'm glad that I am in good position for the finals."

The top New Hampshire racer was Michael Boardman of Pelham, a Colby College graduate in 2017. Boardman has traditionally been a giant slalom specialist but the dual slalom format of the World Pro Ski Tour suited his style. "I loved my first experience on the World Pro Ski Tour because the athletes are incredibly fast, and the atmosphere is so much fun. The format is a bit of a hybrid between slalom and giant slalom, which was good for my skill set. I was surprised at how fast I was, and I hope I can keep it going tomorrow."

 

 

2018 U.S. Olympian Nolan Kasper, right, of Warren, Vermont, and Philippe Rivet of Montreal, Quebec, after competing in World Pro Ski Tour qualifying Friday at Waterville Valley, New Hampshire. Photo credit: Craig Marshall.

2018 U.S. Olympian Nolan Kasper, right, of Warren, Vermont, and Philippe Rivet of Montreal, Quebec, after competing in World Pro Ski Tour qualifying Friday at Waterville Valley, New Hampshire. Photo credit: Craig Marshall.

The History of Ski Racing at Waterville Valley Resort

The next generation of ski racers were honing their skills on the slopes surrounding Waterville Valley, New Hampshire years before the resort even opened its lifts to the public. Founded in 1934, the Waterville Valley Black and Blue Trail Smashers (WVBBTS) Ski Club is one of the oldest in the USA. Thirty years later, in the summer of 1964, Tom Corcoran, a former Olympic ski racer was scouting mountains to establish a ski area:

When we flew over Waterville Valley, all the bells went off in my mind. It was exactly what I was looking for. From the air, it was obvious how it should be laid out and I could see its potential for great skiing.

-Tom Corcoran, Waterville Valley Resort Founder

Waterville Valley Resort opened in December of 1966 and has been an advocate for the sport of ski racing from its earliest years. By the next ski season a junior racing program had begun and with the creation of the first amateur ski racing program by Tom Corcoran and John Fry, Waterville Valley hosted the world’s first NASTAR race.

While developing Waterville Valley Resort, Tom Corcoran's passion for skiing remained at the forefront and he continued to do a considerable amount of masters racing, winning many regional races and three out of four events in the U.S. National Masters Championships in 1968. This passion that built a world-class mountain and resort, also shaped the sport itself. In 1969, Waterville Valley Resort became known as the birthplace of freestyle skiing after creating the first freestyle skiing program and hosting the World Cup Finals where the sport was introduced to the world. The next year, Tom Corcoran and Skiing Magazine editor, Doug Pfiffer, organized the First National Championships of Freestyle Skiing at Waterville Valley Resort in 1970. At the age of 21, Legendary Freestyle Skier Wayne Wong travelled from Vancouver on $200 of sponsorship money to the World Cup Freestyle Finals on Waterville Valley’s True Grit. Wong became Waterville Valley’s head freestyle coach in 1973.

In 1971, U.S. Olympic Alpine and Nordic Ski Teams trained in Waterville Valley for the 1972 Winter Olympics in Sapporo, Japan. The valley’s original ski trail on Snow’s Mountain played host to dual giant slalom team races at night. In the same year, WVBBTS ski club quarters were constructed. Today, the Town of Waterville Valley remains home to the Waterville Valley Academy and WVBBTS. It is one of the leading training and competition centers in the United States, a Certified Gold Level Club, the first in the East to be named a Community Olympic Development Program, and in 2017 Waterville Valley Resort was designated a U.S. Ski and Snowboard Team Development Site.

Over the course of its history, Waterville Valley Resort hosted 10 World Cup Races. Decades later Olympians continued to develop on the slopes of Mt. Tecumseh, including Olympic Gold Medalist Hannah Kearney, who trained through the WVBBTS program under head freestyle coach, Nick Preston. The legacy of world-class ski racing continues to this day as the National Freestyle Championships Mogul Event returns to Waterville Valley in March of 2018.

The North Face Park and Pipe Open hosted at Waterville Valley in 2013 ushered in the new age of freestyle skiing which continued into its 50th Anniversary Year with the Toyota Revolution Tour, also returning for the 2018 season. As significant events continue to return to the historic slopes, Waterville Valley Resort is proud to host the World Pro Ski Tour for the first time. From its inception Waterville Valley has been fostering and showcasing skiing, both competitive and recreational, classic and innovative. Now as a new era of skiing dawns, events like the World Pro Ski Tour are primed to return to slopes like those of Waterville Valley Resort, because as Tom Corcoran and every ski racer knows, some things will always endure:

Time stops. In your concentration, you hear nothing. At the bottom, you’re surprised how much strength it takes to stop, and only then do you realize how fast you’ve been traveling. Your heart starts beating once again... ...You’re out of breath as you become filled with exhilaration from the run you’ve just survived.

-Tom Corcoran, Waterville Valley Resort Founder

 

Back in the day - Waterville Valley

Meet the town with an Olympic Past: Waterville Valley sends athletes to Winter Games

With a long history of Olympic ties, Waterville Valley Resort will once again figure into many storylines that will develop at the 2018 Winter Games in Pyeongchang, South Korea. The United States Olympic Committee has named six WVBBTS/WVA alumni to the 2018 US Olympic Team. That is a lot for a town of about 300 people.

Waterville Valley Academy alumna, Ashley Caldwell, will make the trip to South Korea to compete. Ashley is a freestyle skier who has competed since 2008. Caldwell was named to the US Team for the 2010 Winter Olympics in January 2010 after competing in the sport for only two seasons.

Snowboarder, Mike Trapp, will make his Olympic debut in the parallel giant slalom. Trapp’s coach, Justin Reiter, see his athlete’s success this way, “Mike has worked extremely hard to get here. I’m proud of his dedication to snowboarding and his never surrender attitude. You will not find a better example of a hard working blue-collar athlete out there. We are excited to take the first step in getting to the Games. Now we focus and work to bring home some hardware.”

Other 2018 Winter Olympians with a Waterville Valley connection include Kiley McKinnon (Aerials-A), Mac Bohonnon (Aerials-A), Eric Loughran (Aerials-B), and Annalisa Drew (Pro Halfpipe-Freeskiing).

And, Freydis Einarsdottir, a student at Plymouth State University who trains at Waterville Valley, will represent her home nation of Iceland at the Olympics.

The 2018 Winter Games will kick-off with the Opening Ceremonies on Friday, February 9th.  The aerial events will take place during the first week of competition, February 15-18.  The women’s halfpipe skiing event will take place on February 20th with the parallel giant slalom competition wrapping things up on February 24th.

The hard work and success of Waterville Valley athletes is not a surprise.  Waterville Valley Resort is the birthplace of Freestyle skiing. Freestyle has revolutionized the sport of skiing, paving the way for the new generation of skiing rippers that grace the Waterville parks. Waterville Valley became the first ski area to offer freestyle instruction, with a freestyle program started in 1969-70s.

Freestyle skiing was introduced to the mountain during the 1969 World Cup races, making Waterville Valley a leader in this new and exciting sport. A few years later, Waterville Valley hosted the First National Open Championship of Freestyle Skiing and the WVBBTS ski club began offering freestyle skiing training. By the 1990s, it had fully embraced the sport by building the second freestyle terrain park in the North East.

Cross-country skiing also became a big part of the Waterville Valley ski culture. The U.S. Olympic Team trained in Waterville for the 1972 Winter Olympics in Sapporo, Japan and the area hosted the U.S. National Cross Country Championships in 1979. Today, Waterville Valley’s Nordic Center features 75 km of wide-groomed trails with terrain for every ability level.

Resort visionary Tom Corcoran competed at the 1956 and 1960 winter Olympics, where he earned the highest ranking performance in the Giant Slalom for a U.S. male skier until he was topped by skier Bode Miller.

After Corcoran left the Olympic arena and completed an MBA from Harvard Business School, he headed west to Aspen to learn the ski resort business. In search of his own resort, he took a surveying flight over New Hampshire. On their way back home, the plane circled over Waterville Valley and Corcoran knew he had found the spot. “It was like a light bulb went off,” said Corcoran. When the plane touched the ground, Corcoran set up a meeting to discuss buying the land.

During the winter of 1965-66, Corcoran’s Waterville Company became the owner of the Waterville Inn and 425 acres on the valley floor. He negotiated a contract with the U.S. Forest Service, stewards of the mountain, to use the land on Mt. Tecumseh as a ski area. Corcoran and famed ski area designer, Sel Hannah, surveyed and mapped out the Waterville Valley ski area and began construction in February.

In 1971, U.S. Olympic Alpine and Nordic Ski Teams trained in Waterville Valley for the 1972 Winter Olympics in Sapporo, Japan. The valley’s original ski trail on Snow’s Mountain played host to dual giant slalom team races at night. In the same year, WVBBTS ski club quarters were constructed. Today, the Town of Waterville Valley remains home to the Waterville Valley Academy and WVBBTS. It is one of the leading training and competition centers in the United States, a Certified Gold Level Club, the first in the East to be named a Community Olympic Development Program, and in 2017 Waterville Valley Resort was designated a U.S. Ski and Snowboard Team Development Site.

 

WVBBTS/SEF operates Waterville Valley Academy, a snowsports and academic academy designed for full time student athletes in grades 6-12 who are dedicated to pursuing the highest level of performance in alpine racing, freestyle skiing and snowboarding in parallel with an individualized academic program. 

Olympic  Dreams

Olympic  Dreams